• Autism

    A Multisystem Disease

    Every 45 minutes a child with Autism is born in SA

    Do you know the warning signs?

  • A Biomedical approach

    Evidence of gastrointestinal dysfunction

    Autism as a

    • Neuro-endocrine disorder
    • Metabolic disorder
    • Immune Disorder
    • Disturbed biochemical pathways
    • What are the markers?
  • Sensory Integration Disorder

    The Six Senses

    How does autism affect

    • hearing
    • vision
    • tactile and proprioception
    • pain perception
    • taste and smell?
  • Diets

    Do you know about The Dirty Dozen?

    • Gluten, Casein, Phenols....
    • Learn about the specialised diets for children with ASD
  • Allergies

    A predisposed infant

    Learn about the tests available

  • ADHD

    A Multi-system approach

    Getting the Diagnosis


    • Criteria
    • A Multi-system approach

Autism: The Facts

autism

Autism is a whole body disease, which presents as a neuro-developmental disorder and is affecting a growing number of children in different ways.    Autism is known as a spectrum disorder, involving speech-language delay, impaired social interaction, sensory integration dysregulation and self-stimulatory and ritualistic behaviour.  People presenting on the Autistic Spectrum have  difficulties interacting with others, have inappropriate response to social conversations, cannot interpret nonverbal communication and have difficulty initiating and maintaining friendships appropriate for their age group.   They also become set in and dependent on their routines, are sensitive to external stimuli, handle change with difficulty, are opposisional and defiant when being guided, and become overly interested or fixated on certain topics or objects.  There is a variable range of presentation with people being affected in a spectrum of ways on each level.

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Integrative Medicine

allergies

Integrative Medicine is based on a partnership of patient and practitioner, within which conventional and alternative modalities may be used to stimulate the body’s healing response. It shifts the orientation of medicine from one of disease to one of healing; engages the mind, spirit, body, as well as the community.

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Bio-medical Therapy

biomedical

Biomedical therapy is based on biochemical and biomedical research done all over the world. The Defeat Autism Now! (DAN!) movement includes a range of highly trained medical practitioners – peadiatricians, psychiatrists, neurologists, general (family) practitioners, etc. and other medically trained professionals who adhere to treatment principles guided by regular “Think tanks” (where new research is presented) and research done by the Autism Research Institute (ARI), amongst others.

Biomedical treatment includes dietary intervention, nutrition, supplementation, herbal medicine, the use of homeopathic remedies and allopathic/ conventional medicine.

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What is Autism?

Autism presents as a neuro-developmental disorder and is affecting a growing number of children in different ways. Autism is known as a spectrum disorder, involving speech-language delay, impaired social interaction, sensory integration dysregulation and self-stimulatory and ritualistic behaviour.  People presenting on the Autistic Spectrum can have  difficulties interacting with others, can have inappropriate response to social conversations, can often not interpret nonverbal communication and can have difficulty initiating and maintaining friendships appropriate for their age group.   They can also become set in and dependent on their routines, can be sensitive to external stimuli, often handle change with difficulty, can be opposisional and defiant when being guided, and can become overly interested or fixated on certain topics or objects.  There is a variable range of presentation with people being affected in a spectrum of ways on each level.

According to the DSM-V (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) the diagnosis of autistic spectrum disorder is based upon social-communication criteria; restrictive and repetitive behaviour and sensory disregulation.  The diagnosis is further qualified by stating the age of onset, the level of impairment and adding further associated diagnoses, such as Attention Deficit Disorder, Epilepsy, Anxiety Disorder or others.

Statistics are variable, but at the moment statistics in South Africa elude to a 1:88 incidence.  The incidence of Autistic Spectrum Disorder seems to be increasing rapidly.  Although the new DSM diagnosis does not indicate treatment for autism, but provides diagnostic guidelines to be able to identify the disorder early, so a prompt optimisation plan can be devised.  For developmental delays, early intervention is crucial.

DSM-V Diagnostic Criteria